Sarah Fisher

F, #11029, b. 1848
FatherCharles Fisher b. 4 May 1817, d. 30 Jan 1880
MotherEmily Loche b. 8 Nov 1829, d. 10 Jun 1863
     Sarah Fisher was born in 1848. She was the daughter of Charles Fisher and Emily Loche.
Last Edited29 May 2012

Sarah Anne Fisher

F, #11030, b. 24 June 1876
FatherWilliam Fisher b. 9 Mar 1828, d. 21 Apr 1909
MotherAlice Smith b. c 1843, d. 6 Jan 1918
     Her married name was Lord. Sarah Anne Fisher was born on 24 June 1876 at Tasmania, Australia. She was the daughter of William Fisher and Alice Smith. Sarah Anne Fisher married William Eyre Lord, son of Edward Robert Lord and Harriet Smith, on 21 June 1899 at New Town Congregational Church, New Town, Tasmania, Australia.

Family

William Eyre Lord b. 1873
Children
Last Edited20 Oct 2012

Captain William Fisher

M, #11033, b. 19 September 1813, d. 14 April 1893
FatherConvict Edward Fisher b. 1753, d. 28 Aug 1838
MotherElizabeth Gregory b. 1780, d. 11 Jul 1842
     Captain William Fisher was christened on 19 September 1813 at Van Diemen's Land, Australia. He was born on 19 September 1813 at Sandy Bay, Van Diemen's Land, Australia.1 He was the son of Convict Edward Fisher and Elizabeth Gregory. Captain William Fisher married Lucy Vincent, daughter of John Vincent and Susannah Rivers, on 20 August 1835 at Van Diemen's Land, Australia.1 Captain William Fisher died on 14 April 1893 at Southport, Tasmania, Australia, at age 79.

Family

Lucy Vincent b. 1820, d. 27 Mar 1857
Children
Last Edited19 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S160] Website: Tasmanian Pioneer Index.

William Pearce Fisher

M, #11034, b. 1858
FatherCharles Fisher b. 4 May 1817, d. 30 Jan 1880
MotherEmily Loche b. 8 Nov 1829, d. 10 Jun 1863
     William Pearce Fisher was born in 1858. He was the son of Charles Fisher and Emily Loche.
Last Edited29 May 2012

Mary Ann Fisk1

F, #11040, b. 23 June 1805, d. 11 August 1864
FatherJohn Fisk b. 14 Jul 1776, d. Mar 1858
MotherMary Moore b. 1781, d. Sep 1867
     Her married name was Eblett. Her married name was Biddle. Mary Ann Fisk was born on 23 June 1805 at Fressingfield, Suffolk, England. She was the daughter of John Fisk and Mary Moore. Mary Ann Fisk married Henry Biddle on 7 December 1827 at Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia.1 Mary Ann Fisk married Henry Biddle on 16 November 1840 at 20 John Street, Islington, London, England; Henry Biddle married Mary Ann Eblett (nee Fisk) a widow with a 13 yearold daughter Ellen Mary. Address for both parties was given as 20 JohnSt., Islington.' Mary Ann Fisk emigrated on 2 November 1850; Plymouth, England to Australia. She arrived 15 January 1851 South Australia, Australia. She died on 11 August 1864 at 'Couduroy', Buninyong, Victoria, Australia, at age 59.

Family

Henry Biddle b. 31 Jan 1810, d. 17 Oct 1906
Marriage*She married Henry Biddle on 7 December 1827 at Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia.1 
Marriage Mary Ann Fisk married Henry Biddle on 16 November 1840 at 20 John Street, Islington, London, England; Henry Biddle married Mary Ann Eblett (nee Fisk) a widow with a 13 yearold daughter Ellen Mary. Address for both parties was given as 20 JohnSt., Islington.' 
Children
Last Edited11 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. [S197] Email message from R.P.

Roy Anthony Fisk

M, #11044, b. 22 December 1914, d. 13 December 1989
FatherAnthony Fisk b. Jul 1883, d. 2 Sep 1956
MotherGertrude Charlotte Elizabeth Morris b. 1890, d. 30 Mar 1974
ChartsDescendants of George Price -1811
     Roy Anthony Fisk married Myra Price, daughter of George James (Tom) Price and Ruby Charlotte Lehman, at New South Wales, Australia. Roy Anthony Fisk was born on 22 December 1914 at Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia. He was the son of Anthony Fisk and Gertrude Charlotte Elizabeth Morris. Roy Anthony Fisk died on 13 December 1989 at Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia, at age 74. He was buried circa 15 December 1989 at Apollo Bay Cemetery, 'Krambruk', Apollo Bay, Victoria, Australia.

Family

Myra Price b. c 1921, d. Dec 2008
Last Edited30 Jun 2015

Sophia Fitchto1

F, #11048, b. 1820, d. 1859
     Her married name was Hedditch. Sophia Fitchto was born in 1820. She married Elijah Hedditch, son of Samuel Hedditch and Sarah Charlton, in 1838 at Van Diemen's Land, Australia.1 Sophia Fitchto died in 1859.
Last Edited10 Aug 2010

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.

Elizabeth Fitter

F, #11050, b. 1670
     Her married name was Sanders. Elizabeth Fitter married Joseph Sanders, son of Henry Sanders and Ann Unknown. Elizabeth Fitter was born in 1670 at England. She married Joseph Sanders, son of Henry Sanders and Ann Unknown, on 9 August 1691 at Handsworth, Staffordshire, England.

Family

Joseph Sanders b. 1670
Child
Last Edited9 Mar 2009

Geoffrey Raymond Fitzallen

M, #11052, b. 21 July 1924, d. 12 February 1996
     Geoffrey Raymond Fitzallen was born on 21 July 1924 at Tunbridge, Tasmania, Australia. He was buried in February 1996 at Carr Villa Cemetery, Nunamina Avenue, Tasmania, Australia. He died on 12 February 1996 at Tasmania, Australia, at age 71.
Last Edited1 Sep 2014

Bridgett Fitzmaurice

F, #11060, b. 7 March 1860, d. 14 December 1945
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Johnston. Bridgett Fitzmaurice was born on 7 March 1860 at Tasmania, Australia. She was the daughter of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. Bridgett Fitzmaurice married Walter George Johnston on 30 October 1876 at Tasmania, Australia.1 Bridgett Fitzmaurice lived in 1922 at Tasmania, Australia. She lived in 1943 at Tasmania, Australia. She died on 14 December 1945 at Tasmania, Australia, at age 85.

Family

Walter George Johnston b. 30 Sep 1857, d. 6 Apr 1939
Marriage*She married Walter George Johnston on 30 October 1876 at Tasmania, Australia.1 
Children
Last Edited20 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.

Claude Byron Fitzmaurice

M, #11062, b. 1894
FatherFrancis Fitzmaurice b. 26 Jan 1862
     Claude Byron Fitzmaurice also went by the name of Jack. He was born in 1894. He was the son of Francis Fitzmaurice.
Last Edited7 Nov 2011

Elizabeth Fitzmaurice

F, #11063, b. 1930
FatherGeorge Fitzmaurice b. 1885, d. 7 Mar 1969
MotherMary Catherine Berne b. 26 Aug 1884, d. 5 Nov 1962
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Warke.1 Elizabeth Fitzmaurice died at Victoria, Australia.1 Elizabeth Fitzmaurice was also known as Betty Fitzmaurice. She was born in 1930. She was the daughter of George Fitzmaurice and Mary Catherine Berne.
Last Edited8 Feb 2012

Citations

  1. [S195] Email message from Michelle R.

Ellen Fitzmaurice

F, #11065, b. 28 August 1854, d. 1904
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Rockliff. Ellen Fitzmaurice was born on 28 August 1854 at Van Diemen's Land, Australia. She was the daughter of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. Ellen Fitzmaurice married Aubrey James Rockliff, son of John Rockliff and Emma Maria Boston, on 25 August 1874 at Deloraine, Tasmania, Australia. Ellen Fitzmaurice died in 1904.

Family

Aubrey James Rockliff b. 29 Jul 1850, d. 4 Mar 1926
Children
Last Edited11 Sep 2009

Evelin Maud Fitzmaurice

F, #11066, b. 1885
FatherFrancis Fitzmaurice b. 26 Jan 1862
     Evelin Maud Fitzmaurice was born in 1885. She was the daughter of Francis Fitzmaurice.
Last Edited9 Mar 2009

Convict Francis Fitzmaurice1

M, #11068, b. 1819, d. 10 June 1883
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Convict Francis Fitzmaurice was born in 1819 at Dublin, Ireland. He was convict on 16 October 1834 at Antrim, Antrim, Northern Ireland, (an unknown value.) He was a convict carpenter and a labourer. He worked as a Ticket of Leave man at Clarendon House, Evandale in the mid 1850's.
Francis Fitzmaurice was deported from Ireland in 1835 after being tried at Antrim on 16 October 1834. He was transported to Sydney on the "Lady McNaughton", Then sent to Hobart on the "Sir John Byron"
The Chronology of the Convict Francis Fitzmaurice
By
Peter Richardson
Project Manager
Tasmania's eHeritaqe
Launceston Library, Tasmania
1834 Convicted at Antrim for stealing clothes. Seven years transportation. Age 20? Native place Dublin. One hulk report records his offence as "breaking into a gaol".
1835 Arrived Sydney October25
1836 March 14,10 days in irons, absent and stealing. July 22,50 lashes, neglect of work.
1837 March 20, 50 lashes, insolence. July 29, 36 lashes, absent from work. September 7, 12 months in irons, robbery.
1838 May 19, 36 lashes, insolence. July 7,50 lashes. December 13,50 lashes, absent from gang.
1839 July 8,3 days in cells, absent from gang.
1841 December14, 40 days, hard labour.
1842 May 23,2 years in irons, stealing in a dwelling house.
1843 June 2, Bush ranging (out 10 months), having firearms in possession, sentenced to Life, to VOL.
1844 February 16,5 days solitary confinement, insolence.
March 20 escaped from Port Arthur. [See details below].
1845 January 20, mutinous conduct on board the brig Governor Phillip, committed for trial in Norfolk Island Supreme Court.
June 2, piratical attempt to seize Governor Phillip, transported for life, sentence extended four years on Norfolk Island.
1846 April 8, aiding in an assault on a fellow prisoner, 9 months hard labour in chains. [Cooking Pot Riot took place on July 1, 1846. His nemesis Price took charge of the settlement August 4, 1846].
October 12, having tobacco, 6 days solitary confinement.
1847 May 311 having tobacco, 14 days in chains.
July 6, Insolence, 7 days hard labour in chains. September 13, misconduct, 14 days in chains, having tobacco, hard labour in chains extended one month.
1848 January 5, disorderly in ranks, 14 days in chains.
1851 January 14, arrived back in Hobart. December 10,3 years remission of sentence for good conduct at a fire.
1852 Birth of eldest son John
1853 November 15, ticket of leave.
1854 May 30, permission to marry.
1855 At Clarendon (Evandale) working as a gardener. April 5, One month's imprisonment for misconduct in representing himself as free (see below)
1856 January 1, Conditional Pardon.
1866 December 10, sentenced to 18 months imprisonment for larce
1875 February 25, Fined £1, 9/6 costs for common assault at Deloraine, 14 days imprisonment in default, fine paid.
1883 June 10, Died of exposure to the elements near Deloraine
Newspaper Reports from Tasmania Government Gazette, 29 March 1844
Escaped
From Port Arthur, on the 20th instant
1542 Francis FITZMAURICE, per LADY McNaughton., and Sir John Lyng, tried at Antrim, 16th October 1834, 7 years, and Sydney 0.5.,
12th June 1843, life, carpenter, 5 feet 5%, complexion fair, hair brown to grey, eyes hazel, age 28, native place Dublin, scar left side of forehead, scar back of neck, scar inside left wrist, middle and
forefingers left hand contracted, scar on left shoulder within a circle of leaves, sailor with a flag death's head and bones with sword crucifixion on same arm with two figures in the attitude of prayer, large star right shoulder, the tree of knowledge encircled with a serpent, a Knight Templar with ornamented stars inside right arm, love and liberty Iberia with a harp rose thistle and shamrock love and unity and pretty girls &c. Erin-go-Bragh four men fighting on pit of stomach.
Reward £2, or each lesser sum as may be determined upon by the convicting magistrate.
2045 John SMITH, per Mangles, tried at Wilts. Q.S. 14th October 1534, 7 years, and Hobart Town Supreme Court, 16th July 1540, 15 years, Ploughman 5 feet 10%, complexion brown, hair black, eyes
blue, age 30, native place Osborne, two blue marks inside right arm.
Reward £2, or each lesser sum as may be determined upon by the convicting magistrate.
3254 John SMITH, per Susan and Mary Watson, tried at Central Criminal Court, 2nd March 1825, life and Circuit Court Berrima, 20th September 1842, life, 5 feet 3¼, complexion swarthy, hair brown,
eyes hazel, age 27, woman CD on right arm, ring on ring finger, right hand, JS above elbow right arm, boy and woman CD on left
Reward £2, or each lesser sum as may be determined upon by the convicting magistrate.
1617 Thomas TOOKEY, per Bussorah Merchant and Sea Horse
Tried at Kent 27th March 1826, 7 years, and Melbourne Supreme Court, 15th September 1841, l5years, blacksmith, age 32, complexion swarthy, hair dark brown, eyes dark brown, age 32, native place Newgate Street, London, scar on right eyebrow, mole on left side of neck, scar on upper part of neck from an instrument, five dots on left hand between thumb and finger, St on left arm, scar on left hand, man and woman inside right arm, impediment in speech.
Reward £2, or each lesser sum as may be determined upon by the convicting magistrate.
Hobart Town Courier, April 5, 1844
BUSHRANGERS. - When we noticed the capture of Jones the bushranger and his party by Constable Morgan a fortnight since, we were in hopes that we had done with bush ranging for a time. It has, however, since turned out that, at the very period of the capture of Jones and his confederates, seven men were telegraphed as being absent from Port Arthur, and on the 25th ultimo, it was ascertained that they had succeeded in crossing the straits in a frail canvas canoe, and landed between East- bay Neck and Primrose Point, whither a party of constables had previously been ordered to proceed, upon the supposition that the absentees would make for that point. Information was received of their having, after their landing, proceeded to the house of Moses Roberts, at the Carlton, whom they found with two of his men at dinner. The bushrangers, who were then armed only with sticks and knives, desired them to keep their seats, saying they did not wish to hurt them; they, however, tied them, and coolly proceeded to help themselves to dinner, cast some balls of lead, and took two fowling pieces; they also stripped the party of their clothes, and, having desired them not to stir for the space of an hour, left the house.
The same part are heard of again on the 28th ult. near Buckland, within two miles of which place they robbed the hut of a shepherd in the employ of Mr Orr, from whom they obtained a fowling-piece, some powder and ball, buck shot, tea, sugar, and a little flour. After this they robbed four huts the same evening at the Back River, but obtained only one single fowling-piece, with some clothing; and, being closely pursued by a body of the Hobart Town police, who were at their heels, they took to the Tiers, the rugged nature of which enabled them to escape immediate detection.
On the Sunday following, (the 31st) information was suddenly received of their appearance at the Eastern Marshes, where, at about 8 o'clock in the morning, Mr. G. A. Storey saw four or five men approaching the house with guns. One of the men pointed his gun and desired Mr. Storey to stop where he was. He did so until desired to come into the kitchen, where he found all his men assembled and guarded by two armed men. Five others in the meantime were ransacking the place, and took away with them a fowling-piece, a brass-barreled blunderbuss, two powder flasks, two shot belts, some tea, sugar and wearing apparel. They destroyed one fowling-piece and six muskets, and left without committing any other violence. In less than an hour after, a party of Hobart Town constables reached Mr. Storey's on their route, having been sent out by previous concert to assist the Police Magistrate at Oatlands in the capture of some absconders from that place.
This party, aided by an experienced guide, immediately joined in the pursuit of the bushrangers who had visited Mr. Storey's, and from all we can learn of the police arrangements of our zealous Chief Police Magistrate, we feel justified in predicting their speedy capture.
Hobart Town Courier, April 12, 1844.
BUSHRANGERS. - In our last publication we traced the proceedings of the seven men who escaped from Port Arthur, on the 25th ultimo, to the robbery of Mr. Storey's house, at the Eastern Marshes, on Thursday, the 4th instant. The next thing we heard of them is, that five of their party appeared at the house of Mr. George Bisdee, residing about five miles from Bothwell, who they robbed to a considerable extent; some of the bushrangers ran after Mr. Bisdee, who was endeavouring to escape, and threatened to shoot him if he did not return. Information of this outrage having been communicated, as soon as possible, to the magistrate of Bothwell, that gentleman immediately formed four parties; one headed by himself; another by Mr. Scott of the S2st Regiment; a third by Mr. Reid, junior, of Ratho; and the fourth by the Police Clerk; the latter three gentlemen having volunteered their services. The search was continued by these four parties throughout the night. On Sunday last, the 7th mt., these same five bushrangers were heard of at a hut of Mr. Harrison's three miles beyond Michael Howe's Marsh, and near to Lake Crescent, when they fell in with and detained a man in the service of Mr. Thomas Anstey; they also pressed a man belonging to Mr. McLanachan, whom they accidentally met near the Lakes to act as guide. Information of these circumstances having been promptly conveyed to the various Police parties in the neighbourhood they were all put in motion, and the bushrangers were tracked as far as Antill Ponds, and across the main road in a direct line for the Eastern Marshes. On Monday, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, they robbed Mr. G. C. Clarke's house at Ellenthorpe Hall, where they destroyed a number of muskets and did other mischief. Captain Jones of the 96th having been made acquainted with this attack, detached a party of soldiers with a constable after them, and sent word to the neighbouring districts. Mr. Lascelles, with the blacks, supported by two parties of constables, one under Oldfield and the other under Edwards, succeeded in getting on their trail, and in the course of the night captured one of them, he having quarrelled with and parted company with the other four. Our latest account states that the pursuing parties were following the bushrangers up with the most sanguine hopes of success.
We have already observed that five only of the seven men were out at the attack of Mr. G. Bisdee's house; the other two went to the house of Mr. Plastow, of the Cock- pit, near Bagdad, about 2 o'clock on Friday afternoon, the 5th instant. They, at first, represented themselves to be constables. One of them, however, walked into the kitchen and drove Mrs. Davis (Plastow's daughter) into the room where Plastow was. He then compelled Plastow, his daughter, a Mrs. Jacobson, and the servant, to go into the men's hut, where he guarded them while the other robbed the house of a carbine and musket, a silver watch, some clothing, provisions, tobacco, and 49s. in money. Before they left they broke their own arms to pieces - they confessed they were two of the seven men that escaped from Port Arthur. They did not use any violent threats, but desired Mr. Plastow to be quiet. We are happy to add that these two men have since been taken, and were marched into Hobart Town on Wednesday.
The full particulars of their capture have not yet transpired; but we can state thus much, that they were secured on Monday evening last at the Bagdad Inn, kept by Mr. Wing, where, it is understood, they had the "cool impudence" to proceed a few hours after their robbery at Plastow's and ordered a supper. we hear that Mr. Palmer of the Swan Inn assisted very materially in taking these men. There are now three out of the seven who originally escaped from Port Arthur in custody.
Hobart Town Courier, April 12, 1844.
About 11 o'clock a.m. on Monday last, the 8th inst., five armed men appeared in the yard of the premises of G. C. Clarke, Esq., of Ellenthorpe Hall, near Ross. Mr. C. was then about forty yards from the door of his house; his storekeeper, Mr. Webster, was about the same distance on the opposite side of the yard. Mr. W., hearing footsteps, walked into the middle of the yard, where he was ordered to stand. Mr. Clarke, hearing the word bushranger mentioned at this time, immediately ran to the house door, and when rushing in a shot came past his legs; he was met just inside the door by his housekeeper, and, with her assistance, was in the act of closing the door, when one of the bushrangers, presenting a pistol, thrust himself between the door and the jam post; another one appeared presenting fire-arms, and threatening if Mr. Clarke did not surrender they would blow his brains out. Mr. Clarke was then ordered to stand alongside three others with the old shepherd, tied together, Mr. C. refusing to be tied, the bushrangers had brought them into the yard; a guard of two and occasionally three were then placed over Mr. C. and the rest, while the other bushrangers ransacked the house, commencing by breaking several muskets, and collecting what things they intended to take with them. This occupied about two hours and a half; during this time they got into the cellar and brought out a bottle of brandy (one of three that were there, the other two were broken) part of which they distributed among Mr. C's men; six bottles of port, sherry, and champagne were emptied; how many bottles they took with them is not known; they were then about an hour taking dinner, relieving each other. After this one went into the stable and saddled two horses, when they all prepared to start, taking with them a quantity of wearing apparel, three blunderbusses, one double-barrelled gun, one brace of pistols., shotbelts, and powder flasks, and one telescope. A party of constables, with the blacks, arrived shortly after, and succeeded in capturing one of them the following morning with the horses. Nothing has been heard of the rest or their pursuers. - Communicated.
Hobart Town Courier, April 19th, 1844
BUSHRANGERS. - Since our last account of the four Port Arthur men who attacked Mr. G.C. Clarke's house, at Ellenthorpe, we hear that one of their number has been captured by Mr. Barrow's overseer, at the Black Snake.
Hobart Town Courier, April 26th, 1844.
THE BUSHRANGERS. - Since our last week's report of the capture of one of the four Port Arthur bushrangers, the remaining three had been heard of in the neighbourhood of Marlborough. On Monday, the 15th instant, they entered a hut belonging to Mr. Bryson, in the daytime, representing themselves, at first, as constables. One of the three had a pair of handcuffs. Two of them were armed with blunderbusses, independently of guns and pistols. Their behaviour on this occasion is described as having been "civil" but we are bound to add that they condescended to take away with them a damper, half a pound of tea, and two or three pounds of sugar. One of these ruffians was dressed in a blue jacket, drab trousers, and a hat, which has obtained the somewhat slang term of a "Jim Crow."
The other two were enveloped in long brown top coats, which, it appears, they stated were stolen by them from Mr. G. C. Clarke, of Ellenthorpe Hall. They enquired of Mr. Bryson the best route to cross the Big Pine River, and finally left his hut at about 6 o'clock in the evening. The intelligence of the robbery at Mr. Bryson's hut did not reach Marlborough, although the distance is stated to be only sixteen miles, until Thursday the 18th; but the delay is accounted for by the circumstance of Mr. Bryson's want of horses, and the rivers in the neighbourhood being very much out, vast quantities of snow and rain having fallen during the three previous days.
On Sunday, the 21st, the three bushrangers were again fallen in with by a party of four constables at Collas, near some plains distinguished by the unenviable title of "Skull-bone Plains." This reconnoiter happened at about eleven o'clock in the day, and eight or nine shots were exchanged. One of the bushrangers is supposed to be wounded in the leg. The constables obtained possession of nine rounds of ball cartridge, a pair of handcuffs, a quart pot, and a belt. The bushrangers appear to have seen the constables first, and so far had the advantage of preparation; they, however, retreated, and made for the Pine River, in the direction of the tier.
There can be no doubt, from their having got so far to the westward on the verge of the habitable districts, that they have been hard pressed by the pursuing parties. Now they must either return to the settled districts, or risk starvation by pushing further into the New Country. Judging from their choice of difficulties, we have every hope of being able to report their capture in our ensuing publication.
Hobart Town Advertiser, May 14th, 1844.
ORE BUSHRANGING.- We have information of three men armed with pistols and double-barrelled guns, having visited the establishment of Roderic O'Connor, Esq., at the Lake River, about ten o'clock on Tuesday morning. They secured fourteen men, and then proceeded to ransack the house. One of the servants, having perceived the approach of the bushrangers, made his escape and communicated the circumstance to a Neighbour, who dispatched a messenger to others. Two Messrs. Fletcher, Mr. Young, and others, hastened to the spot, but the bushrangers had decamped, having taken with them some tea, flour, clothes, and fifteen shillings from the person of an old man. The gentlemen pursued them, and came to a spot where a fire had been evidently recently lighted and extinguished, but although they remained scouring the bush until three o'clock in the afternoon, they did not discover any further trace of the absconders. The servant who spread the alarm in the succeeded in escaping; having suspicion that another servant had prompted him to escape, he was ordered by one of the bushrangers to sit down and "have his ears cropped." the ruffian deliberately drew out a knife, but did not proceed to the execution of his diabolical threat. - Ibid.
Hobart Town Courier, June 7th, 1844.
BUSHRANGERS.- The solitary three bushrangers, Fitzmaurice, Smith and Tookey, who have so far escaped the general capture since their absconding with four confederates from Port Arthur in
January last, have at length, in all probability, very nearly run their course. Driven from their place of refuge at the Lake Country by the severity of the weather, which has also untenanted the shepherd's hut from which they have been used to derive a plundering subsistence, they have ventured again into the settled districts, and on Monday night showed themselves at the premises of Mr. Jones, who keeps the Half- way House on the Bothwell road. They remained but a very short time, and were very civil indeed in their demeanour, taking nothing with them but some bread and spirits, with which they set out to face the darkest and most inclement night which has been experienced this season. Prompt pursuit is making.
Launceston Examiner, June 22nd, 1844.
BUSHRANGERS. - On Wednesday morning about six o'clock three bushrangers paid a visit to Mr. Sutherland's about a mile from Mr. Gatenby's. The runaways remained about three hours; and after regaling themselves they left, taking some provisions, clothing, wine, and a purse containing 25s. Their behaviour was not violent; and upon being informed, in reply to a question, that Priest had not returned Mr. Sutherland's watch, they appeared surprised, and promised to see Priest about it. It is supposed that these men were the three who robbed Mr. Gatenby's, and were supposed to have gone over the isis.
Hobart Town Courier, June 28th, 1844.
BUSHRANGING. - Our country friends will be glad to hear that the eight Port Arthur prisoners, Gazetted last week as absconders, have been captured and lodged in durance. This circumstance offers some compensation for the extended immunity hitherto enjoyed by their three predecessors - the relics of the gang of seven, whose depredations have made them familiar to most parts of the country - Fitzmaurice, Smith and Hookey (sic). From our country reports we learn that the latest known depredation committed by these men was at the residence of J.C. Sutherland, Esq., on the River isis, in the middle of last week. The inmates, as usual, were taken completely by surprise, and thus incapacitated from offering assistance. After the robbers had taken what they required, they decamped, conveying away the men- servants of the establishment with them. Money, jewellery, and spirits seemed to be the great objects of their search, but we are rejoiced to hear they obtained but an indifferent booty.
Their subsequent course has not been traced. A feeling appears to exist in the interior that a special reward should be offered for the apprehension of these prisoners, and in this we entirely agree. Their apprehension cannot be effected without danger to the lives of their captors, and few individuals value their existence so lightly as to be willing to imperil it, even under a sense of duty, for the small amount of two pounds. We sincerely trust that His Excellency will consider this; in the worst aspect of the colonial revenue it can afford five pounds for the capture of these ruffians, of which the amount would, in fact, be saved by abridging the duration and detailed expense of pursuit.
Hobart Town Courier, July 5th, 1844.
REWARD FOR BUSHRANGERS. - By a misprint in our last number, the reward we ventured to suggest for the apprehension of the bushrangers Fitzmaurice, Tookey and Smith, appeared as five pounds in place of FIFTY, which we designed to recommend. We are glad to have it in our power to record the apprehension of two more armed absconders in the district of Oatlands since our last. This service was effected by the scouring party of police under Constable Burbidge.
Hobart Town Courier, July 19th, 1844.
BUSHRANGERS: - One of the three Port Arthur bushrangers; a man named Tookey, has been apprehended by the bravery of a woman. The particulars are as follows:- On Saturday morning, the 15th instant, two of the bushrangers, Smith and Tookey (their third companion, Fitzmaurice, being ill) made their appearance at the shepherd's hut situate just under the extremity of the Western Tier.
here they got breakfast, and previous to their departure two men, named Marsden and Strugnefl, entered the hut. The bushrangers compelled these two to proceed with them, taking their course in a southward direction along the tier. Half-way between the hut where they breakfasted and Mr. Connell's house, at Jacob's Sugar Loaf (the whole distance being 12 miles) the party crossed the Isis.
Soon after they fell in with an old ticket-of-leave man, Hodgell, who they also compelled to accompany them. Between four and five o'clock in the evening they arrived at Connell's. Before entering the kitchen they compelled the three prisoners to sit down, and also Robert Brian, who happened to be there, and Mr. Connell himself. They then brought from another room Mr. Connell's son and his four daughters, and Tookey stood sentinel over the whole party, while Smith proceeded to ransack the house, taking Mrs. Connell with him. Thus two hours passed, Mrs. Connell watching a favourable opportunity to make a capture, or give an alarm. Smith, when preparing to quit the premises gave his gun to Tookey, whilst he engaged in packing up the collected booty, which was by no means inconsiderable. While thus employed he missed his knife, which Mrs. Connell suggested he must have left in the room up stairs. Smith thus induced to go up, Mrs. Connell unlocked the door for him, and drawing her attention to a knife of her own which was on the floor, he no sooner entered to pick it up than she locked him in. She the ran down the stairs into the kitchen and clasped Tookey in her arms, rendering him for the moment with the guns in his hands, quite powerless.
At the same time she called out to Brian, who, assisted by Connell and his son, rushed upon Tookey and, after a desperate struggle, overmastered the ruffian. One of the guns went off during the scuffle. Smith, meanwhile, who is described as an active fellow, finding himself a prisoner, pulled out the storeroom window; and escaped over the roof of a verandah immediately in front of the kitchen door, which he attempted to enter, but at this moment Miss Connell locked it. The window was then smashed, and a pistol fired through it, when Connell took up Smith's gun and fired in return. Smith eventually escaped with the loss of his gun, but taking with him a watch which he took from the person of Robert Brian. This man recently received a conditional pardon, and by his promptitude mainly contributed to the success of Mrs. Connell's daring attempt. Some articles, supposed to be part of the property taken from Mr. Sutherland, were found on Tookey.
Thus has the spirited and heroic conduct of Mrs. Connell been the means of capturing one of a formidable trio of bushrangers, of depriving two of their arms; and of completely disorganising the schemes of plunder which the three together had most probably planned. We feel it unnecessary to prompt the Local Government to mark their approbation of Mrs. Connell's conduct, as we are quite sure they will neither be slow to acknowledge or to reward it. This is not the first time that Mrs. Connell has shown equal tact and courage in effecting the capture of bushrangers. We remember an anecdote told of her at the time that Regan and his associates were spreading terror and dismay among the settlers. It was just after the attack upon Ellenthorpe Hall, when the then Police Magistrate of Campbell town happened to meet her. "Well, Kitty", said he, "this is a bad business, that they should have let these fellows escape so easily - surely there were plenty of men to have taken them." Kitty replied with much naivete, "Yer honour may say that, sure there were plenty of women to have taken `em, let alone the men, if they had a mind."
Colonial Times, August 27th, 1844.
BUSHRANGERS.- On Friday evening last, about eight o'clock, two armed bushrangers (one being the man Smith, who so narrowly escaped from the valour of Mrs. Connell, a short time since) paid a
visit to the residence of Mr. Joseph Johnson, near Green Ponds; they took the inmates so completely by Surprise, that they "bailed" them up in detail, and placed them in the kitchen, Mr. George Beaumont, of the Old Wharf, who happened to be there on a visit, sharing the same fate. They then commenced the usual work of plunder, taking from Mr. Johnson nearly £100 in cash, and some 17s. or 18s. from Mr. Beaumont, with his double-barrelled gun, and a rifle belonging to the house: they also took, stole, and carried away, a quantity of tea, pork, linen, &c., pressing onto their temporary service, as bearer of the "swag", Mr. Johnson's shepherd, who returned, however, in about twenty minutes. The fellows carried each a brace of pistols and a double-barrelled piece; and gave their victims the agreeable notice that, if they gave any information relative to their visit, within an hour and a half, they would pay them another "domiciliary visit" and burn the house. &c., over their heads! Notwithstanding this, however, information was speedily conveyed to the township (about a mile distant), when three constables started away in pursuit, but without any success, - and thus the case stands at present. in 1835. Hewas transported in 1835 on the convict transport ship 'Lady McNaughton' from Dublin Ireland to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He arrived on 30 October 1835 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from Irelandon the convict transport ship 'Lady McNaughton'. He arrived at on the convict transport ship 'Sir John Byng' on 23 September 1843 in Hobart, Van Diemen's Land, Australia from Sydney. He married Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell, daughter of (?) Nancy, on 19 June 1854 at St. Joseph's Church, Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, Australia. Convict Francis Fitzmaurice died on 10 June 1883 at Tasmania, Australia, It is officially recorded that Francis Fitzmaurice died from "Exposure to the Elements" however it has been suggested by descendents that he was actually murdered. His body was found in the grounds of a church at Deloraine. He was buried on 13 June 1883 at Chudleigh or Deloraine, Tasmania, Australia, Francis is reputed to be buried at Chudleigh. However we cannot find his grave or any official records to support this.

Family

Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
Marriage*He married Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell, daughter of (?) Nancy, on 19 June 1854 at St. Joseph's Church, Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, Australia
Children
Last Edited11 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. [S81] Unknown author Dr. Peter Bellamy.

Francis Fitzmaurice

M, #11069, b. 10 September 1855, d. 30 March 1856
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Francis Fitzmaurice was born on 10 September 1855 at Tasmania, Australia. He was the son of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. Francis Fitzmaurice died on 30 March 1856 at Tasmania, Australia.
Last Edited19 Oct 2015

Francis Fitzmaurice

M, #11070, b. 26 January 1862
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Francis Fitzmaurice was born on 26 January 1862. He was the son of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. Francis Fitzmaurice was a Hotel Owner on 31 July 1913 at Stanley, Tasmania, Australia.1
Last Edited6 Nov 2011

Citations

  1. [S3] Website: The Examiner Newspaper.

Francis Frederick Fitzmaurice

M, #11071, b. 30 March 1890
FatherHenry Fitzmaurice b. 1867
MotherEmily Hoarne
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Francis Frederick Fitzmaurice was born on 30 March 1890 at Tasmania, Australia. He was the son of Henry Fitzmaurice and Emily Hoarne.
Last Edited6 Nov 2011

Francis William Fitzmaurice

M, #11072, b. 1890
FatherFrancis Fitzmaurice b. 26 Jan 1862
     Francis William Fitzmaurice was born in 1890. He was the son of Francis Fitzmaurice.
Last Edited9 Mar 2009

George Fitzmaurice1

M, #11073, b. 1885, d. 7 March 1969
FatherJohn Fitzmaurice b. 29 Jun 1852, d. 28 Mar 1932
MotherEmma Willson b. 1855, d. 8 Feb 1936
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     George Fitzmaurice was born in 1885 at Tasmania, Australia, No. 950 Type: Birth registration. He was the son of John Fitzmaurice and Emma Willson. George Fitzmaurice married Mary Catherine Berne, daughter of Thomas Bernes and Catherine Collins, on 27 September 1919. George Fitzmaurice died on 7 March 1969 at Victoria, Australia. He was buried circa 9 March 1969 at Fawkner Cemetery, Fawkner, Victoria, Australia, Site RC 15194.

Family

Mary Catherine Berne b. 26 Aug 1884, d. 5 Nov 1962
Children
Last Edited15 Jan 2013

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.

Henry Fitzmaurice

M, #11075, b. 1867
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Henry Fitzmaurice was born in 1867. He was the son of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. Henry Fitzmaurice married Emily Hoarne on 15 January 1890 at Tasmania, Australia.
Last Edited8 Nov 2011

Henry Angus Fitzmaurice

M, #11076, b. 1887
FatherFrancis Fitzmaurice b. 26 Jan 1862
     Henry Angus Fitzmaurice was born in 1887. He was the son of Francis Fitzmaurice.
Last Edited6 Nov 2011

Ivy Gladys Fitzmaurice

F, #11079, b. 1892
FatherHenry Fitzmaurice b. 1867
MotherEmily Hoarne
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Ivy Gladys Fitzmaurice was born in 1892 at Burnie, Tasmania, Australia. She was the daughter of Henry Fitzmaurice and Emily Hoarne.
Last Edited8 Nov 2011

John Fitzmaurice

M, #11083, b. 27 September 1890, d. 28 March 1932
FatherJohn Fitzmaurice b. 29 Jun 1852, d. 28 Mar 1932
MotherEmma Willson b. 1855, d. 8 Feb 1936
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     John Fitzmaurice married Ruby Maria Miles at Tasmania, Australia. John Fitzmaurice was born on 27 September 1890 at Tasmania, Australia.1 He was the son of John Fitzmaurice and Emma Willson. John Fitzmaurice died on 28 March 1932 at Devon Public Hospital, Latrobe, Tasmania, Australia, at age 41.

Family

Ruby Maria Miles
Children
Last Edited7 Aug 2014

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.

John Fitzmaurice

M, #11085, b. 29 June 1852, d. 28 March 1932
FatherConvict Francis Fitzmaurice b. 1819, d. 10 Jun 1883
MotherConvict Mary Ellen McDonnell b. 1827
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     John Fitzmaurice was also known as John FiITZMORRIS Fitzmaurice. He was born on 29 June 1852 at Van Diemen's Land, Australia. He was the son of Convict Francis Fitzmaurice and Convict Mary Ellen McDonnell. John Fitzmaurice was was a Labourer and carpenter. Farmer. circa 1870. He married Emma Willson, daughter of John Willson and Mary Ryan, on 9 November 1875 at Tasmania, Australia, Witnesses to marriage
William Fitzmaurice and Mary Willson.

Ceremony performed by Edward F. Walsh.

Registry entry No. 54. John Fitzmaurice died on 28 March 1932 at Devon Public Hospital, Latrobe, Tasmania, Australia, at age 79. He was buried on 30 March 1932 at Catholic Cemetery, Latrobe, Tasmania, Australia.

Family

Emma Willson b. 1855, d. 8 Feb 1936
Marriage*He married Emma Willson, daughter of John Willson and Mary Ryan, on 9 November 1875 at Tasmania, Australia, Witnesses to marriage
William Fitzmaurice and Mary Willson.

Ceremony performed by Edward F. Walsh.

Registry entry No. 54. 
Children
Last Edited5 Jan 2016

Emma Joyce Fitzmaurice1

F, #11087, b. 10 December 1920, d. September 2005
FatherGeorge Fitzmaurice b. 1885, d. 7 Mar 1969
MotherMary Catherine Berne b. 26 Aug 1884, d. 5 Nov 1962
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Boots.1 Emma Joyce Fitzmaurice was born on 10 December 1920. She was the daughter of George Fitzmaurice and Mary Catherine Berne. Emma Joyce Fitzmaurice died in September 2005 at age 84.

Family

Child
Last Edited20 Jan 2012

Citations

  1. [S195] Email message from Michelle R.

Julia Lorna Fitzmaurice

F, #11088, b. 18 April 1926, d. 10 November 1982
FatherMichael Fitzmaurice b. 28 Dec 1896, d. 11 Jul 1977
MotherDorothy Ethel Bonney b. c 1900, d. 13 Sep 1982
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Prosser. Julia Lorna Fitzmaurice was born on 18 April 1926 at Smithton, Tasmania, Australia. She was the daughter of Michael Fitzmaurice and Dorothy Ethel Bonney. Julia Lorna Fitzmaurice married Private John Tasman Prosser, son of George Stewart Prosser and Nellie Amelia Palmer, on 18 December 1948 at The Church of Apostles, Margaret Street, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, (an unknown value.)1 Julia Lorna Fitzmaurice was a nurse by occupation. She worked at the Zeehan Hospital in the early part of her career. When she moved to Launceston she worked at the Aberfyle Nursing Home (No longer inexistence). She worked at numerous other nursing homes in the Launceston area during her career. She was forced to give up nursing because of a back injury. During her later years Julie worked on a voluntary basis forthe Disabled Persons Association at their premiseson Invermay Road Launceston. A room on these premises was named afte rJulie in appreciation of her dedication and assistance to that organization.

A nurse by occupation. She worked at the Zeehan Hospital in the early part of her career. When she moved to Launceston she worked at the Aberfyle Nursing Home (No longer inexistence). She worked at numerous other nursing homes in the Launceston area during her career. She was forced to give up nursing because of a back injury. During her later years Julie worked on a voluntary basis forthe Disabled Persons Association at their premiseson Invermay Road Launceston. A room on these premises was named afte rJulie in appreciation of her dedication and assistance to that organization.



Mercury Newspaper: Tuesday 3 June 1947

ELEVEN nurses from the
Launceston General Hos- pital and the Homoeopathic Hos- pital, Launceston, will discard their uniforms on Friday hight to donFix this text glamorous white debutante frocks when they will be presented to the Governor (Sir Hugh Binney) and Lady Binney at the Florence Night- ingale Ball at the Albert Hall. Nurses to be presented from the General Hospital are Barbara Nicholls, Julie Fitzmaurice, Elizabeth Handley, Elaine Wingrove, Elaine Baker, Jill Richardson, Greta Andrews, and from the Homoeopathic, Gwen; Dawe, Barbara McGee, Elizabeth Standaloft, and Margaret Gibson. The girls are being-trained by Miss Greta Dean, of Launceston. circa 1950 at Tasmania, Australia. She was Catholic. She died on 10 November 1982 at The Launceston General Hospital, Charles Street, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, at age 56 cause of death was Pulmonary Embolism. She was buried on 12 November 1982 at Carr Villa Cemetery, Nunamina Avenue, Tasmania, Australia, Site A 14 126 -
Julie died on the 10 November 1982, however her headstone states she died on the 11 November, this is incorrect. It is not known how this error occurred.

Family

Private John Tasman Prosser b. 11 Aug 1921, d. 19 Jul 2009
Marriage*She married Private John Tasman Prosser, son of George Stewart Prosser and Nellie Amelia Palmer, on 18 December 1948 at The Church of Apostles, Margaret Street, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia, (an unknown value.)1 
Child
Last Edited1 Feb 2013

Citations

  1. [S3] Website: The Examiner Newspaper.

Lawrence Fitzmaurice

M, #11089, b. 11 August 1883, d. 1912
FatherJohn Fitzmaurice b. 29 Jun 1852, d. 28 Mar 1932
MotherEmma Willson b. 1855, d. 8 Feb 1936
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Lawrence Fitzmaurice There is confusion over the actual birth date of Lawrence.

Lawrence FITZMAURICE
Born on 11 August 1883.
Born on 24 May 1887 in Deloraine, Tasmania. He was born on 11 August 1883 at Tasmania, Australia.1 He was the son of John Fitzmaurice and Emma Willson. Lawrence Fitzmaurice died in 1912.
Last Edited7 May 2009

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.

Leila Dorothy Fitzmaurice

F, #11090, b. 26 October 1923, d. 14 April 1989
FatherMichael Fitzmaurice b. 28 Dec 1896, d. 11 Jul 1977
MotherDorothy Ethel Bonney b. c 1900, d. 13 Sep 1982
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Her married name was Spinks. Leila Dorothy Fitzmaurice was born on 26 October 1923 at Alambie Hospital, Smithton, Tasmania, Australia. She was the daughter of Michael Fitzmaurice and Dorothy Ethel Bonney. Leila Dorothy Fitzmaurice married Frederick Louis Spinks on 31 January 1948 at Rosebery, Tasmania, Australia. Leila Dorothy Fitzmaurice lived in 1989 at Tasmania, Australia. She died on 14 April 1989 at Tasmania, Australia, at age 65.

Family

Frederick Louis Spinks b. 1 Oct 1924, d. 8 Apr 1972
Last Edited6 Nov 2011

Lucas Fitzmaurice

M, #11091, b. 5 October 1892
FatherJohn Fitzmaurice b. 29 Jun 1852, d. 28 Mar 1932
MotherEmma Willson b. 1855, d. 8 Feb 1936
ChartsDescendants of Francis Fitzmaurice - 1819
     Lucas Fitzmaurice was born on 5 October 1892.1 He was the son of John Fitzmaurice and Emma Willson.
Last Edited5 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. [S205] Website: Archives Office of Tasmania.